Now Reading
Tems On The Cut – I was always in my own little world, I wasn’t very social

    Tems On The Cut – I was always in my own little world, I wasn’t very social

    Avatar of TheCriticCircle
    Nigerian R&B songstress Tems, South African pop sensation Tyla, acclaimed Nigerian DJ/producer Spinall, and Skepta are among the major acts set to captivate crowds in Indio this April.

    In a candid and introspective conversation with The Cut, Tems, the acclaimed Nigerian singer-songwriter, delved into her early life, unique sound, and the transformative journey to becoming a confident global music sensation.

    Nigerian R&B songstress Tems, South African pop sensation Tyla, acclaimed Nigerian DJ/producer Spinall, and Skepta are among the major acts set to captivate crowds in Indio this April.

    Growing up in the vibrant city of Lagos, Nigeria, alongside her brother Tunji and her mother, Tems confessed to being an introverted child who found solace in the realm of her imagination. A revelation unfolded that she didn’t commence speaking until the age of three, a period during which her love for singing began to blossom.

    “I was always in my own little world. I wasn’t very social,” shared Tems with The Cut, providing insight into her formative years as a reserved and introspective individual.

    The interview shed light on the challenges she faced, recounting instances where she was bullied by other children, leading to moments of tears and introspection. The piece highlighted the artist’s inclination to cover her head with a blazer, symbolizing her desire to retreat from the scrutiny and judgment of her peers.

    She also opened up about grappling with societal expectations, particularly concerning her vocal pitch. Unsolicited comments from strangers and how the belief that her voice sounded “like a boy or a frog” contributed to a decline in her self-esteem during her early years.

    See Also
    Ehans Gyan Picker Die Ke

    “All the other girls had these sweet, high voices, and my voice had bass,” Tems expressed, articulating the struggle she faced in embracing her unique vocal identity.

    However, secondary school proved to be a turning point for Tems. Under the guidance of her music teacher, she discovered newfound confidence and began to embrace her individuality. The journey of self-acceptance culminated in Her deciding to celebrate her distinctive deep voice, boldly expressing, “If you think I sound like a man, I think that’s pretty cool – I’m gonna sound more like a man. I started to want that deepness. I wanted to lean into my weirdness.” She said.

    The full interview with Tems can be found in The Cut.

    Sending
    User Review
    0% (0 votes)
      View Comments (0)

      Leave a Comment

      Scroll To Top